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Mary K. Stillwell in Friends Journal

Searching article titles, author names, and full text of all articles since 2002:

Mary Dyer: Courageous Witness and My Foremother

“It’s not fair! My name is Mary Dyer and I’m younger than that girl! I should have been the one […]

Mary Dyer Hubbard is a member of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church in Warrington, Pa. The quotations in this article are taken from "Notable Women Ancestors: Women's Biographies (Mary Barrett Dyer)," at http://www.rootsweb.com/~nwa/dyer.html.


Posted in: Features
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Mary Fisher: Maidservant Turned Prophet

When Friends in Moscow recently designed a postcard to share the message of Quakerism, the 17th‐century Quaker they chose to […]

Marcelle Martin is a member of Chestnut Hill Meeting in Philadelphia, Pa., and the resident Quaker Studies teacher at Pendle Hill in Wallingford, Pa.


Posted in: Features
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A Measure of Light: A Novel

Most readers know Mary Dyer as a martyr for religious freedom, specifically Quaker faith. But few of us know her […]

Beth Taylor is a member of Westerly (R.I.) Meeting and author of The Plain Language of Love and Loss: A Quaker Memoir. She is co-director of Brown University’s Nonfiction Writing Program.


Posted in: November 2015 Books, November 2015: Books and Pop Culture, Quaker Book Reviews, Uncategorized
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Books February 2014

The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI By Betty Medsger. Knopf, 2014. 608 pages. $29.95/hardcover. Reviewed by […]

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Mary Penington (1625–1682)

Mary Penington’s name is usually mentioned first because she was married to Isaac, and secondarily as mother of Gulielma, William […]

Brian Drayton is a member of Weare (N.H.) Meeting.


Posted in: Features
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April Milestones 2012

Anthony—James W. Anthony, 73, on July 15, 2009, in Sudbury, Mass. Jim was born on June 17, 1936, in Columbus, […]


Posted in: Milestones
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Mary and William Dyer: Quaker Light and Puritan Ambition in Early New England

By Johan Winsser. Self‐published, 2017. 345 pages (includes appendix and extensive notes). $24.95/paperback; $9.99/eBook. Mary Dyer’s story as a Quaker […]

Gwen Gosney Erickson lives in Greensboro, N.C., where she is employed as the Quaker librarian and college archivist at Guilford College. She currently serves as clerk of North Carolina Yearly Meeting (Conservative). Her first encounters with Mary Dyer were as a six-year-old sitting on the statue at Earlham College.


Posted in: Creativity and the Arts, June/July 2018 Books, Quaker Book Reviews
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Mary Dyer: Friend of Freedom

By John Briggs. Atombank Books, 2014. 102 pages. $6.99/paperback; $2.99/eBook. Recommended for ages 8–12. If Quakers were predisposed to naming […]

Katie Green is a member of Worcester (Mass.) Meeting, where she edits their newsletter and teaches First-day school. She is also a storyteller and has led workshops at the Friends General Conference Gathering and New England Yearly Meeting Sessions.


Posted in: December 2015 Books, December 2015: Economic Justice and Poverty, Quaker Book Reviews, Uncategorized
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The Prophecy of Mary Peisley Neale

Mary Peisley was born into a Quaker family in Ballymore, County Kildare, Ireland, in 1717. At age 27, she was […]

Paul Buckley, a member of Clear Creek Meeting in Richmond, Ind., is a Quaker historian and theologian.


Posted in: Features
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WeAnswer

We Answered with Love: Pacifist Service in World War I

Edited by Nancy Learned Haines. Pleasant Green Books, 2016. 412 pages. $19.95/paperback. In 1917 Mary Peabody and Leslie Hotson were […]

Beth Taylor is a member of Westerly (R.I.) Meeting and is the co-director of the Nonfiction Writing Program at Brown University and the author of The Plain Language of Love and Loss: A Quaker Memoir.


Posted in: AFSC Centennial, April 2017 Books, Quaker Book Reviews
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