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@ John Marquette

Love in the Time of Coronavirus

Carrying on with the care of our meetings.

Gabriel Ehri is Executive Director. [email protected]

Posted in: Among Friends, The State of Quaker Institutions
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TheMaking

The Making of a Democratic Economy: Building Prosperity for the Many, Not Just the Few

By Marjorie Kelly and Ted Howard. Berrett‐Koehler Publishers, 2019. 192 pages. $26.95/hardcover or eBook.

Pamela Haines is a member of Central Philadelphia (Pa.) Meeting. Her most recent book is Money and Soul, an expansion of a Pendle Hill pamphlet by the same name.

Posted in: April 2020 Book Reviews, Quaker Book Reviews, The State of Quaker Institutions
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HowToBe

How to Be an Antiracist

By Ibram X. Kendi. One World, 2019. 320 pages. $27/hardcover; $13.99/eBook.

Lori Patterson lives in Portland, Ore., where she teaches women’s studies at her local college, attends Multnomah Meeting (where she serves on the Racial Justice Committee), and runs an independent yarn and fiber dyeing business out of her home.

Posted in: April 2020 Book Reviews, Quaker Book Reviews, The State of Quaker Institutions
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TheRoad

The Road to Healing: A Civil Rights Reparations Story in Prince Edward County, Virginia

By Ken Woodley. NewSouth Books, 2019. 224 pages. $27.95/hardcover; $9.99/eBook.

Patience A. Schenck is a member of Annapolis (Md.) Meeting and a resident of Friends House Retirement Community in Sandy Spring, Md. She is the author of two Pendle Hill pamphlets, Answering the Call to Heal the World and Living Our Testimony on Equality: A White Friend’s Experience.

Posted in: April 2020 Book Reviews, Quaker Book Reviews, The State of Quaker Institutions
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World

World of Trouble: A Philadelphia Quaker Family’s Journey through the American Revolution

By Richard Godbeer. Yale University Press, 2019. 480 pages. $38/hardcover or eBook.

Larry Ingle is a member of Chattanooga (Tenn.) Meeting and clerk of the meeting’s Space Expansion Committee. He is writing on Jessamyn West and Whittaker Chambers, and thinking about Rufus Jones.

Posted in: April 2020 Book Reviews, Quaker Book Reviews, The State of Quaker Institutions
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Quaker Works April 2020

This semiannual feature highlights the recent works of Quaker organizations in eight categories.

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© Dusty Barnes on Unsplash

Uncertainty, an Unnamed Quaker Creed?

Moving beyond belief in the “absolute perhaps.”

Rhiannon Grant is a member of Bournville meeting in Birmingham, UK, and works at Woodbrooke, the Quaker center. Her book on Quaker theology, Telling the Truth about God, came out last year, and her introduction to Quakerism, Quakers Do What! Why? will appear in July 2020. Email: [email protected].

Posted in: Features, Unnamed Quaker Creeds
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A Quaker meeting in the eighteenth century, vintage engraving.

When Is a Creed Not a Creed?

Revisiting that of God in every man.

Ann Birch is a member of El Paso (Tex.) Meeting, where she is currently the clerk. She is a librarian, a grandmother, and active in local theater.

Posted in: Features, Unnamed Quaker Creeds
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AWord

A Word from the Lost: Remarks on James Nayler’s Love to the Lost and a Hand Held Forth to the Helpless to Lead Out of the Dark

By David Lewis. Inner Light Books, 2019. 276 pages. $35/hardcover; $25/paperback; $12.50/eBook.

Brian Drayton worships with Souhegan Meeting in Wilton, N.H., allowed by Weare (N.H.) Meeting.

Posted in: March 2020 Book Reviews, Quaker Book Reviews, Unnamed Quaker Creeds
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A Natural Unfolding

By Donna Eder. Pendle Hill Pamphlets (number 457), 2019. 30 pages. $7/pamphlet or eBook.

Philip Favero resides on Bainbridge Island, Wash., and is a member of Agate Passage (Wash.) Meeting.

Posted in: March 2020 Book Reviews, Quaker Book Reviews, Unnamed Quaker Creeds
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