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All photos taken in Katie and Phil's garden. Courtesy of the author.

Earthcare: Finding God in the Garden

Working in the earth keeps a Friend grounded.

Katie Green is a member and past clerk of Worcester (Mass.) Meeting. She is a storyteller, teacher, and grandmother. Katie taught First-day school in Worcester and edited the Worcester Meeting newsletter. She and her husband, Phil Stone, also attend Clearwater Meeting in Dunedin, Fla.


Posted in: Earthcare, September 2017
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resman

Heaven-based Living

A brief glimpse of eternity inspires a search for understanding.

Michael Resman is a member of Rochester (Minn.) Meeting and an editor for What Canst Thou Say? His books include A Contemporary Mysticism.


Posted in: Features, The Art of Dying
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The author (center) with her sister Bonnie (left) and mother. Photo taken a few months before Bonnie's death. Photo courtesy of the author.

Weeping to Joy

God heals in unexpected ways.

Betsy Blake builds websites and communication strategies for companies and organizations trying to do good in the world. Her photojournalism work was recently featured on CNN and NBC news. Betsy lives in Greensboro, N.C., and is a member of First Friends Meeting. Learn more about Betsy at betsyblake.com.

 

This version has been slightly edited from the printed piece.


Posted in: Features, The Art of Dying
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estle

Integrity and the Ultimate

How can we talk about death when we鈥檙e so vibrantly alive?

Susann Estle is a chaplain at the Putnamville Correctional Facility in Greencastle, Ind.; a PRN chaplain at Hendricks Regional Health Hospital; and a part-time pastor at Hopewell Friends Church in Dana, Ind. She is mother to Case and Chloe.


Posted in: Online Features, The Art of Dying
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Life, Death, and Resilience

Among Friends: Our introduction to the June/July issue.

Gabriel Ehri is聽executive director of Friends Journal.


Posted in: Among Friends, Reimagining the Quaker Ecosystem
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Via <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/revdave/459210631">Flickr/revdave</a>

It Breaks My Heart

The fractured nature of the Quaker community breaks a Friend’s heart

Kate Pruitt is lab director at a small hospital in North Carolina. After farming organically for 18 years, she returned to her home state to escape the weather and find community. Connecting and exploring the Quaker way beginning in 2005 has opened up her spiritual path.


Posted in: Online Features, Reimagining the Quaker Ecosystem
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the-moth-snowstorm

The Moth Snowstorm: Nature and Joy

By Michael McCarthy. New York Review Books, 2016. 273 pages. $24.95/hardcover; $14.99/eBook. 鈥淧eople from a planet without flowers would think we must be mad with joy the whole time to have such things about us.鈥 鈥擨ris Murdoch, A Fairly Honourable Defeat The Moth Snowstorm is not about moths, but instead is part autobiography, part nature […]

Ruah Swennerfelt is a member of Burlington (Vt.) Meeting. She currently serves as clerk of New England Yearly Meeting鈥檚 Earthcare Ministry Committee and is author of Rising to the Challenge: The Transition Movement and People of Faith.


Posted in: June/July 2017 Books, Reimagining the Quaker Ecosystem
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welsh-poem

On a Friend’s 70th聽Birthday

FJ Poetry: His feet walk daily paths, as duties call…

Bob Welsh lives in聽Black Mountain, N.C.

The obituary of the subject of Welsh’s聽poem, Bob Barrus, also appears in the May 2017 issue.


Posted in: Poetry, Quaker Summers
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davis_brooks

The following is a letter of protest

Student Voices: “Under your administration, many of my friend鈥檚 families would be deported, never to be seen again. I can assure you that while they may not be citizens, they are every bit as much patriotic Americans, no different from me. And in light of this, I urge you to do what is beneficial for […]

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Malak-Qaradeh

America has always welcomed immigrants from all over the world

Student Voices: “About two years ago, I visited the Statue of Liberty for the first time. I can recall being at Ellis Island with my family where we looked up my great-great-grandpa鈥檚 name from all those who immigrated to the United States in 1911. Mr. President, those immigrants made America great.”

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