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Tag Archives | faith

2019 Gathering Young Adult Friends. © Mike Goren.

Advancing Quaker Spirituality in the Twenty‐first Century

Preparing for the future of the 100‐year‐old FGC Gathering.

Barry Crossno became the general secretary of Friend General Conference in 2011. He joined Friends in Taos, New Mexico, and now lives in Philadelphia with his wife Beth and their eleven-month-old son, Auden. He recently co-authored Pendle Hill Pamphlet No. 460 with J. Brent Bill titled On Vocal Ministry. Email: [email protected].

 

Posted in: Features, The State of Quaker Institutions
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@ Casey Horner/Unsplash

Why I Identify as Quaker

The question is not if God exists, but what is the nature of God.

Kurt H. Parkum lives in Mechanicsburg, Pa.

Posted in: The State of Quaker Institutions, Viewpoint
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© Kaspars Grinvalds

Thou Shalt Wear Comfy Shoes

Do our attitudes toward formal dress push people out the door?

Suzanne W. Cole Sullivan is a convinced Friend who lives and worships in Georgia (mostly), but they can often be spotted at meetings around the country during weekend adventures. Suzanne carries a concern for hospitality and a culture of welcoming. Suzanne is often heard before they are seen.

Posted in: Features, Unnamed Quaker Creeds
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Mural in Newberg, Ore., painted by George Fox University students for the Yamhill County Mural Project. © Tim Mossholder on Unsplash.

How to Be an Inclusive Quaker

The unwritten norms of speech and silence.

Valerie Brown is a Buddhist and Quaker teacher, retreat leader, leadership coach, and writer. She is the founder of Lead Smart Coaching. She leads an annual pilgrimage to walk the Camino de Santiago in Spain to celebrate the power of sacred places.

Posted in: Features, Unnamed Quaker Creeds
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© Dusty Barnes on Unsplash

Uncertainty, an Unnamed Quaker Creed?

Moving beyond belief in the “absolute perhaps.”

Rhiannon Grant is a member of Bournville meeting in Birmingham, UK, and works at Woodbrooke, the Quaker center. Her book on Quaker theology, Telling the Truth about God, came out last year, and her introduction to Quakerism, Quakers Do What! Why? will appear in July 2020. Email: [email protected].

Posted in: Features, Unnamed Quaker Creeds
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A Quaker meeting in the eighteenth century, vintage engraving.

When Is a Creed Not a Creed?

Revisiting that of God in every man.

Ann Birch is a member of El Paso (Tex.) Meeting, where she is currently the clerk. She is a librarian, a grandmother, and active in local theater.

Posted in: Features, Unnamed Quaker Creeds
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Teilhards

Teilhard’s Struggle: Embracing the Work of Evolution

By Kathleen Duffy. Orbis Books, 2019. 176 pages. $20/paperback; $16.50/eBook.

Carl Blumenthal is a member of Brooklyn (N.Y.) Meeting.

Posted in: February 2020, February 2020 Book Reviews, Quaker Book Reviews
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Becoming

Becoming an Ordinary Mystic: Spirituality for the Rest of Us

By Albert Haase. InterVarsity Press, 2019. 176 pages. $16/paperback; $15.99/eBook.

William Shetter is a member of Bloomington (Ind.) Meeting.

Posted in: February 2020, February 2020 Book Reviews, Quaker Book Reviews
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The Cass Corridor neighborhoods on the west end of Midtown Detroit, Michigan, 1990s. Photos © Michael Brozovic, Detroit, Mich.

The Liturgy of Me

The rhythms of a life stuck in a daily cycle of brokenness and violence.

r. scot miller attends Red Cedar Meeting in Lansing, Mich., with his spouse, Jenn, and their family. He holds graduate degrees from Earlham School of Religion (MA and MDiv) and Grand Valley State University (MSW). He is currently a PhD student at Chicago Theological Seminary.

Posted in: Drugs, Features
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The-Windings-Path

The Winding Path of Transformation: Finding Yourself Between Glory and Humility

By Jeffrey Tacklind. InterVarsity Press, 2019. 192 pages. $17/paperback; $16.99/eBook.

Ken Jacobsen and his wife, Katharine, until her death in 2017, served as teachers and co-directors in various Quaker communities such as Olney Friends School and Pendle Hill. Ken has taught theology and healing at Chicago Theological Seminary and has led retreats on Jesus’s teachings. He keeps his home in Wisconsin as a poustinia, a prayer house for travelers.

Posted in: Drugs, January 2020 Book Reviews, Quaker Book Reviews
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