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Tag Archives | prison

guide-for-white-women

The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys

Edited by Eddie Moore Jr., Ali Michael, and Marguerite W. Penick-Parks. Corwin, 2018. 472 pages. $27.95/paperback or eBook. Some years […]

Patience A. Schenck is a member of Annapolis (Md.) Meeting and lives at Friends House in Sandy Spring, Md. She is passionate about ending racism with a current emphasis on criminal justice reform.


Posted in: Quaker Book Reviews, September 2018, September 2018 Books
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draw-your-weapons

Draw Your Weapons

By Sarah Sentilles. Random House, 2017. 320 pages. $28/hardcover; $13.99/eBook. Assembled like a collage or impressionist painting, Draw Your Weapons […]

Lori Patterson lives in Portland, Ore., where she teaches women’s studies at her local college, attends Multnomah Meeting in Portland (serving on the Racial Justice Committee), and runs an independent yarn and fiber dyeing business out of her home.†


Posted in: August 2018 Books, Going Viral with Quakerism, Quaker Book Reviews
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books-racial-purity-dangerous-bodies

Racial Purity and Dangerous Bodies: Moral Pollution, Black Lives, and the Struggle for Justice

By Rima Vesely-Flad. Fortress Press, 2017. 226 pages. $34/paperback; $4.99/eBook. A couple of years ago, I visited a man I […]

Patience A. Schenck is a member of Annapolis (Md.) Meeting, now living happily at Friends House in Sandy Spring, Md. She volunteers with Maryland Alliance for Justice Reform.


Posted in: Creativity and the Arts, June/July 2018 Books, Quaker Book Reviews
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farapart

Far Apart, Close in Heart: Being a Family When a Loved One Is Incarcerated

By Becky Birtha, illustrated by Maja Kastelic. Albert Whitman and Company, 2017. 32 pages. $16.99/hardcover. Recommended for ages 4–8. With […]

Alison James is a member of South Starksboro (Vt.) Meeting.


Posted in: May 2018 Books: A Young Friends Bookshelf, Quaker Book Reviews, What Are Quaker Values Anyway?
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Thurston Corder Hughes

Hughes—Thurston Corder Hughes, 87, on November 20, 2016. Thurston was born in 1928 in Germany under a different name, which […]

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Herbert Ward Fraser

Fraser—Herbert Ward Fraser, 96, on May 2, 2017, in Richmond, Ind. Herb was born on February 23, 1921, in Andover, […]


Posted in: February 2018
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lucretia-mott-speaks

Lucretia Mott Speaks: The Essential Speeches and Sermons

Edited by Christopher Densmore, Carol Faulkner, Nancy Hewitt, and Beverly Wilson Palmer. University of Illinois Press, 2017. 304 pages. $75/hardcover; […]

Marty Grundy is a member of Wellesley (Mass.) Meeting, New England Yearly Meeting.


Posted in: January 2018 Books, Quaker Book Reviews, Quaker Lifestyles
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13

13th

Written by Ava DuVernay and Spencer Averick, directed by Ava DuVernay. Netflix Documentary, 2016. 100 minutes. Public screenings are free […]

David Etheridge is a member of Friends Meeting of Washington (D.C.) and clerk of Baltimore Yearly Meeting’s Working Group on Racism.


Posted in: August 2017 Books, Quaker Book Reviews, The Art of Dying
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Lucy-Joy-Rupertus

One of the many injustices that I am craving for you to change is the death penalty

Student Voices: “Our world is killing people who might not have even committed the crime they’ve been sentenced for. People […]

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Nawal-N'Garnim

I want my brother to be able to drive without having the fear of being pulled over

Dear President Donald Trump, Being under 18, I had no say in the election, but I would like to mention […]

Student Voices: “The system is rigged. Too many people are being incarcerated, especially minorities due to the color of their skin. A way to help fix this problem would be to have police officers go through extensive training and wear body cameras at all times.”


Posted in: Quaker Summers, Student Voices Project, Uncategorized
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