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Tag Archives | Rufus Jones

Quakers-Reading-Mystics

Quakers Reading Mystics

By Michael Birkel. Brill, 2018. 124 pages. $81/paperback or eBook; $30/article. Simultaneously published as issue 1.2 (2018) of Quaker Studies.

Brian Drayton worships with Souhegan Meeting in Wilton, N.H., allowed by Weare (N.H.) Meeting.

Posted in: Drugs, January 2020 Book Reviews, Quaker Book Reviews
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a-seekers-theology

A Seeker’s Theology: Christianity Reinterpreted as Mysticism

By John G. Macort. Self‐published, 2016. 231 pages. $9.50/paperback. John Macort, formerly an Episcopalian priest but long acquainted with Friends […]

Brian Drayton worships with the new Souhegan Meeting, allowed by Weare (N.H.) Meeting.

Posted in: April 2018 Books, Healing, Quaker Book Reviews
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hill

Meeting with Friends in an Old Library

A visitor settles down at the library table at Beacon Hills Friends House.

Sheilah Hill has conducted mental health programs at such organizations as Bronx Lebanon Hospital; Allegheny University; and the Learning Annex, New York City. Her books include, Somewhere on the Edge of Dreaming; They That Sow in Tears; and La Verde de la Vida, Wisdom for the Abortion War.

Posted in: Features, Quaker Libraries
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Robert H. Tollefson

Tollefson—Robert H. Tollefson, 91, on January 27, 2017, in Tipp City, Ohio. Bob was born on May 17, 1925, in […]

Posted in: Conscience, Milestones
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WeAnswer

We Answered with Love: Pacifist Service in World War I

Edited by Nancy Learned Haines. Pleasant Green Books, 2016. 412 pages. $19.95/paperback. In 1917 Mary Peabody and Leslie Hotson were […]

Beth Taylor is a member of Westerly (R.I.) Meeting and is the co-director of the Nonfiction Writing Program at Brown University and the author of The Plain Language of Love and Loss: A Quaker Memoir.

Posted in: AFSC Centennial, April 2017 Books, Quaker Book Reviews
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Being Rufus Jones

Life in the meeting.

Daniel Lee is a member of Indianapolis First Friends Meeting. A longtime bike rider and writer, he credits cycling with helping to lead him to Indiana and then to Quakerism. Daniel lives with his wife and three children in Carmel, Ind.

Posted in: Life in the Meeting, May 2016: Gender and Sexuality
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Personality and Place: The Life and Times of Pendle Hill

By Douglas Gwyn. Plain Press, 2014. 512 pages. $20/paperback; $15/eBook. Buy on FJ Amazon Store Querencia (from the Spanish verb “querer”) is a metaphysical […]

Valerie Brown is a member of Solebury Meeting in New Hope, Pa., and a long-time Pendle Hill teacher and retreat leader. She is principal of Lead Smart Coaching, LLC (leadsmartcoaching.com), specializing in leadership and mindfulness training.

Posted in: November 2015 Books, November 2015: Books and Pop Culture, Quaker Book Reviews, Uncategorized
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60th Anniversary: Books

A look back at 60 years of Quaker reading.

Trevor Johnson is the editorial fellow at Friends Journal through Quaker Voluntary Service’s second year Alumni Fellows program.

Posted in: From the Archives, November 2015: Books and Pop Culture
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valle

Of Stinkbugs and God

Spiritual nurture and young children.

Joshua Valle is a pre-K teacher at Friends School of Baltimore, his alma mater. He lives in Baltimore, Md., with his wife and daughter (a Friends School student) and enjoys reading, writing, and spending time in the woods.

Posted in: April 2015: Mentorship: Teaching Our Values, Features
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9k=-1

Reflections of a Quaker: A Blank Slate Theology (Books in Brief)

By Warren L. Treuer. 338 pages. Self‐published, 2014. $24.99/paperback. Sometimes those with long experience give the gift of sharing insights […]

Karie Firoozmand is the Friends Journal books editor.

Posted in: April 2015 Books, April 2015: Mentorship: Teaching Our Values, Quaker Book Reviews
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