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Young Adult Quaker Ministers: Mary Fisher and Elizabeth Fletcher

"I believe that some young people have old souls and that these young people become seasoned spiritual leaders at an early age if they follow their Guide and have oversight." —Deborah Fisch Having Quaker children of my own who are in their teen and young adult years, I began in the winter of 2000 to research the stories of youth and young adults who lived in England at a time when the Religious Society of Friends was in its youth itself. I found short descriptions of young people who accomplished remarkable things compared to others🔒

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Barbara Luetke-Stahlman, a member of Penn Valley Meeting in Kansas City, Mo., lives in Wilson, N.C. Material for this article is drawn from her book 17th Century Remarkable Quaker Youth. For this essay she has relied heavily on Phyllis Mack’s Visionary Women: Ecstatic Prophecy in Seventeenth-Century England (Univ. of California Press, 1992).


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