Quantcast

Robert Purvis: Friend of the Friends

Across the road from Byberry Meeting in the 19th century, on the northeast edge of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, stood Harmony Hall, the estate of Robert Purvis, a colored gentleman farmer, organizer of the first underground railroad, abolitionist, and an ardent spokesman for full equality for women, Native Americans, and persons of color. Two of Purvis’s sons are buried in the meeting’s burial ground, and near the meetinghouse stands Byberry Hall, built by Purvis in 1846 and given to the meeting as a place for the community to debate issues of human rights. Robert Purvis and his wife, Harriet Forten🔒

Friends Journal Member? Sign in here!


Not an FJ member? To read this piece, please join us today! For $28, you’ll get:

  • A year of Friends Journal delivered to your mailbox (11 issues) and email
  • Full, instant access to the world’s largest online library of Quaker information: every Friends Journal ever published, going back to 1955
  • Membership in a community that believes in the power of Quaker experience

Click here to join us!

Already a member? Welcome back. Please use the Login box to sign in. If you would like to order by phone or have any questions, we’re here to help. Call toll-free: (800)471‑6863 or contact us by email.

Margaret Hope Bacon, a member of Central Philadelphia (Pa.) Meeting, is a lecturer and author of 13 books on various aspects of Quaker history and biography, and vice president of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society. She is writing a book on Robert Purvis. © 2002 Margaret Hope Bacon


Posted in: Features

, ,

Comments are closed.
Sign up for Friends Journal's weekly e-newsletter. Quaker stories, inspiration, and news emailed every Monday.
Web comments may be used in the Forum column of the print magazine and may be edited for length and clarity.