In Brief:

By Harbert Rice. Embudo Valley Press, 2020. 126 pages. $14.99/paperback; $7.99/eBook.

Eugene Gendlin was a twentieth-century philosopher whose work and practice coincided with psychology. Part of Gendlin’s contribution was inclusion of bodily “knowing” as a legitimate component of human formation within the world and interaction with it. His beliefs about experiential knowledge overlap Quaker process for decision making, which Rice explores and explains in this self-published book. He also examines transformations that take place in Alternatives to Violence Project workshops in prisons, where Quaker process changes and adapts to answer the needs of the participants—a process that Rice also sees as related to Gendlin’s work.

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