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Submissions: Write for Friends Journal

Friends Journal welcomes articles, poetry, art, photographs, and letters from our readers. We are also helped by your comments and questions. We are an independent magazine serving the entire Religious Society of Friends. Our mission is “to communicate Quaker experience in order to connect and deepen spiritual lives,” which allows for a variety of viewpoints and subject matter. We welcome submissions from Friends and non-Friends alike.

We prefer articles written in a fresh, non-academic style. Friends value an experiential approach to life and religious thought. Our readers particularly value articles on: exploring Friends’ testimonies and beliefs; integrating faith, work and home lives; historical and contemporary Friends; social concerns and actions; and the variety of beliefs across the branches of Friends.

Friends Journal prefers articles with a constructive approach to spiritual seeking. We seek an open, curious and respectful tone even when discussing controversial subjects. We prefer articles rooted in the author’s own experiences of the divine. Submissions should show an awareness of Friends’ ways and concerns, as well as sensitivity to them.

If you have questions about our submissions process or would like to pitch an idea before writing, you can contact Senior Editor Martin Kelley at martink@friendsjournal.org. By submitting to Friends Journal, you acknowledge that you have read and agree to the legal agreement found at http://www.friendsjournal.org/legal.

Click to learn more or submit:

  • Forum and ViewpointsReader responses and general reflections.
  • MilestonesBirths, adoptions, marriages/unions, and deaths.
  • Art and PhotographsHigh-resolution artwork for the magazine.
  • News ItemsNews, epistles, and reports from events.
  • PoetryWe generally publish 2-3 poems in each issue. Please use this form for all poetry, even poems that might be intended for specific issues.

Feature submissions and upcoming topics:

  • General Feature Submissions

    We know there's lots of great Quaker writing which doesn't fit any of the topics in our upcoming issues listings. We leave two issues a year "open" to general interest articles that come in. The next of these take place in December 2014, March 2015, and September 2015, and February 2016.
    Submit Now »
  • Jan 2015: Climate Change

    Now that the phenomenon of climate change has been generally acknowledged, how are Friends moved to act on it? We seek both first-hand stories about how changing climate is affecting us and stories of action, both personal and collective. We hope to receive a diversity of opinions to match the debate on best-actions taking place within the larger Quaker community. Deadline 10/01/2014.
    Submit Now »
  • Feb 2015: Life Transitions

    Quakers don't generally observe the kind of life-passage ceremonies common in other spiritual traditions. How then do we—or should we—recognize events such as births, adoption, children growing into adulthood, aging, and death? Is there a way we can help meeting members with life changes such as adoption, divorce, or selling family homes? Deadline 11/01/2014.
    Submit Now »
  • Apr 2015: Mentorship and Teaching Our Values

    Quaker spirituality is widely known for its diversity and tolerance and mistrust of absolutes. How do we teach our values in a way that embraces this openness and encourages dialogue? And how do we mentor one another—both young Friends and Friends growing into membership or into a ministry? The April issue will also feature our second-annual Student Voices project. Deadline 01/05/2015.
    Submit Now »
  • Student Voices Project

    Our second annual Student Voices Project calls all middle school (grades 6–8) and high school (grades 9–12) students to add their voices to the Friends Journal community of readers. We happily welcome submissions from all students at Friends schools (Quaker and non-Quaker) and Quaker students in other educational venues (public schools, private schools, home school). This year's theme is Peace, Conflict, and Justice, and participants may choose from eight different prompts (listed on our Student Voices Project page). Deadline 01/05/2015.
    Submit Now »
  • May 2015: Friends and Other Faiths

    How do Friends engage with other traditions? Many of us come from other faiths or combine faiths as either a personal practice or for family reasons. What spiritual paths give you sustenance as a Quaker? And what are the challenges, dangers, and delights of mixing faiths as Friends?
    Submit Now »
  • Jun/Jul 2015: Activists vs Mystics vs Pragmatists

    We've all seen it: a contentious issue divides the floor of a decision-making meeting along familiar lines. Neither side feels respected or listened to and Friends go away feeling opportunities were missed. Friends are activists working on social change, we're mystics working on communion with the Light, and we're pragmatists making a living in the world with integrity. How do we bridge these divisions as Friends?
    Submit Now »
  • Aug 2015: The Effects of War

    Friends may be antiwar but we try to reach out to the humanity of soldiers. How do relate to military personnel in our families? How do we support troops without supporting war? What kind of counseling can we give returning soldiers with PTSD? How do we confront the continuing use of torture by U.S. military? This month marks the 70th anniversary of the U.S. atomic bombing of Hiroshima.
    Submit Now »
  • Oct 2015: Faithful Living

    For this issue, we're looking for smaller, more personal stories, of how Friends live out our spirituality in the world. What does community mean to you on a personal level? How do you interact with Friends at Quaker gatherings and yearly meeting sessions? What's your relationship with other faiths and causes in your hometown?
    Submit Now »
  • Nov 2015: Quakers in Pop Culture

    Friends may be small in number but we show up in pop culture quite a bit. Some well-known artists are Quakers. What is it like to be a Quaker celebrity, either in the larger world or within a Friends context? How should we ourselves consume movies and music—are there cautions or limits? And are there ways we can use popular media like YouTube to share the Quaker message more widely?
    Submit Now »
  • Jan 2016: The Political Process

    Get ready, the first primaries for the 2016 U.S. Presidential election are happening. How should Friends engage in the political process? How do we choose who to support—or whether we should opt out all together? Are there historical examples of Friends' participation we can turn to for inspiration?
    Submit Now »

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