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Tag Archives | audience

write-to-me

Write to Me: Letters from Japanese American Children to the Librarian They Left Behind

By Cynthia Grady, illustrated by Amiko Hirao. Charlesbridge, 2018. 32 pages. $16.99/hardcover; $9.99/eBook. Recommended for ages 4–8. When some of […]

Ann Birch is a librarian and a member of El Paso (Tex.) Meeting.


Posted in: December 2018 Books: A Young Friends Bookshelf, Quaker Book Reviews, Quakers and Christianity
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roses-and-radicals

Roses and Radicals: The Epic Story of How American Women Won the Right to Vote

By Susan Zimet with Todd Hasak‐Lowy. Viking, 2018. 168 pages. $19.99/hardcover; $10.99/eBook. Recommended for ages 10 and up. An accessible […]

Gwen Gosney Erickson is a librarian and archivist at Guilford College in Greensboro, N.C.


Posted in: December 2018 Books: A Young Friends Bookshelf, Quaker Book Reviews, Quakers and Christianity
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peterson1

A Reluctant Minister

Reflections on performance art among Friends.

A Bible scholar, filmmaker, playwright, activist, and actor, Peterson Toscano playfully explores the serious worlds of LGBTQ issues, religion, and climate change. After spending 17 years attempting to “de-gay” himself through gay conversion therapy, he came out a quirky, queer Quaker who recognizes the power of storytelling, petersontoscano.com.


Posted in: Creativity and the Arts, Features
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renegade

Renegade: Martin Luther, the Graphic Biography

By Dacia Palmerino, illustrated by Andrea Grosso Ciponte, translated by Michael G. Parker. Plough Publishing House, 2017. 160 pages. $19.95/paperback; […]

Isaac Barnes May is a member of Charlottesville (Va.) Meeting. He is a doctoral candidate in religious studies at the University of Virginia.


Posted in: April 2018 Books, Healing, Quaker Book Reviews
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editors-desk3

Writing Opp: Going Viral with Quakerism (due 5/14)

What’s the Quaker message for today? How do we communicate it and how do we share it? What are some […]

Martin Kelley is senior editor of Friends Journal.


Posted in: From the Editor's Desk
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editors-desk3

Writing Opp: Creativity and the Arts (Due 3/5)

Early Friends were famously skeptical of art; modern Friends pretty much fully embrace it. Why the abrupt turnaround? What reasons […]

Martin Kelley is senior editor of Friends Journal[email protected]


Posted in: From the Editor's Desk
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editors-desk3

Writing Opp: What Are Quaker Values Anyway? (Due 2/5)

If there’s a Quaker brand, then “Quaker values” is its most common pitch. What do we mean when we use […]

Martin Kelley is senior editor of Friends Journal. Contact: [email protected]


Posted in: From the Editor's Desk
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editors-desk3

Writing Opp: Quakers and Healing (due 1/15)

Our April 2018 issue will look at Quakers healing. I’ve always been struck by the ambivalence of early Friends on […]

Martin Kelley is senior editor of Friends Journal: [email protected]


Posted in: From the Editor's Desk
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first-day-stories

First Day Stories

FJ Review: “First Day Stories is a perfect lesson starter for First‐day schools and an important book to have in every Quaker […]

Emilie Gay is a member of Brooklyn (N.Y.) Meeting.


Posted in: Conflict and Controversy, December 2017 Books: A Young Friends Bookshelf, Quaker Book Reviews
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leisurly

A Leisurely Introduction to How a Bible‐believing Christian Can Accept Gay Marriage in the Church

By Becky Ankeny. Meetinghouse, 2017. 42 pages. $3/pamphlet; free eBook. Evangelical Friends in Northwest Yearly Meeting have for some time […]

Mitchell Santine Gould is the leading authority on Walt Whitman’s Quakerism, and runs the website leavesofgrass.org. His analysis of transcendentalism as the secularization of Quakerism has appeared in Quaker History and in Quaker Theology. He is an attender at Multnomah Meeting in Portland, Ore.


Posted in: Conscience, October 2017 Books, Quaker Book Reviews
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