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Writing Opp: Creativity and the Arts (Due 3/5)

Early Friends were famously skeptical of art; modern Friends pretty much fully embrace it. Why the abrupt turnaround? What reasons might there have been for early strictures? And what cautions from early Friends might they still hold for us today? Is all art the same or is there such a thing as Quaker art? Are […]

Martin Kelley is senior editor of Friends Journal: [email protected]


Posted in: From the Editor's Desk
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Writing Opp: What Are Quaker Values Anyway? (Due 2/5)

If there’s a Quaker brand, then “Quaker values” is its most common pitch. What do we mean when we use the term for Quaker institutions and the ministries of our meetinghouses and churches? Is it anything deeper than the “SPICES” testimonies? Submissions due February 5, 2018.

Martin Kelley is senior editor of Friends Journal. Contact: [email protected]


Posted in: From the Editor's Desk
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Writing Opp: Quakers and Healing (due 1/15)

Our April 2018 issue will look at Quakers healing. I’ve always been struck by the ambivalence of early Friends on the topic. The first generation went about the British and American countrysides like a band of newly reincarnated biblical apostles, healing people they met in miraculous ways. George Fox came across a man who had […]

Martin Kelley is senior editor of Friends Journal: [email protected]


Posted in: From the Editor's Desk
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First Day Stories

FJ Review: “First Day Stories is a perfect lesson starter for First-day schools and an important book to have in every Quaker home with young children.”

Emilie Gay is a member of Brooklyn (N.Y.) Meeting.


Posted in: Conflict and Controversy, December 2017 Books: A Young Friends Bookshelf, Quaker Book Reviews
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leisurly

A Leisurely Introduction to How a Bible-believing Christian Can Accept Gay Marriage in the Church

By Becky Ankeny. Meetinghouse, 2017. 42 pages. $3/pamphlet; free eBook. Evangelical Friends in Northwest Yearly Meeting have for some time experienced schismatic turmoil over the issue of same-sex marriage—or, as Becky Ankeny puts it, “full inclusion of LGBTQ persons in the life of the church.” Although it goes unmentioned in A Leisurely Introduction, it is […]

Mitchell Santine Gould is the leading authority on Walt Whitman’s Quakerism, and runs the website leavesofgrass.org. His analysis of transcendentalism as the secularization of Quakerism has appeared in Quaker History and in Quaker Theology. He is an attender at Multnomah Meeting in Portland, Ore.


Posted in: Conscience, October 2017 Books, Quaker Book Reviews
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Transfigurations

Transfigurations—Transgressing Gender in the Bible

Written and performed by Peterson Toscano; directed by Samuel Neff. Barclay Press, 2017. 103 minutes. $20/DVD; $14.99/download; $2.99/online rental. I first saw Peterson Toscano’s play, Transfigurations—Transgressing Gender in the Bible, shortly after it premiered in late 2007. A character revelation in the last scene brought me to tears at that show—and half a dozen times […]

Kody Gabriel Hersh is a queer, trans, young adult, Christian, Quaker, youth worker, writer, and activist. They are a member of Miami (Fla.) Meeting (Southeastern Yearly Meeting), currently living in Philadelphia, Pa.


Posted in: Conscience, October 2017 Books, Quaker Book Reviews
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You Will Not Have My Hate

By Antoine Leiris, translated by Sam Taylor. Penguin Press, 2016. 144 pages. $23/hardcover; $15/paperback; $11.99/eBook. Antoine Leiris began writing You Will Not Have My Hate (originally published in French as Vous N’Aurez Pas Ma Haine by Librairie Arthème Fayard, Paris) in the days after his wife, HĂ©lène, was killed in the November 2015 Paris terror […]

Lauren Brownlee is a member of Bethesda (Md.) Meeting and the DC Peace Team. She also serves on Baltimore Yearly Meeting’s Peace and Social Concerns Committee.


Posted in: August 2017 Books, Quaker Book Reviews, The Art of Dying
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Swarthmore Hall, in North West England, organizational center of the early Friends movement. Photo Martin Kelley.

ePublishers of Truth

The shared lessons of strengthening a movement among Friends.

Kathleen Wooten is a member of Fresh Pond Meeting in Cambridge, Mass. She travels extensively among Friends with a concern for how we connect both digitally and face-to-face. She also serves New England Yearly Meeting as events coordinator and social media manager. Kathleen shares her travels and learning at quakerkathleen.wordpress.com.


Posted in: June/July 2017: Reimagining the Quaker Ecosystem, Online Features
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A Bike Like Sergio’s

By Maribeth Boelts, illustrated by Noah Z. Jones. Candlewick Press, 2016. 40 pages. $15.99/hardcover. Recommended for ages 5–8. This is that rare story—a moral tale that’s subtle and suspenseful. Ruben wants a bike. He knows just how a bike would improve his already pleasant, though not opulent, life. On an errand to buy some groceries […]

Dee Birch Cameron is a librarian in El Paso, Tex., whose work has appeared previously in Friends Journal.


Posted in: Quaker Book Reviews, Quaker Summers, Young Friends Bookshelf
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Nine, Ten: A September 11 Story

By Nora Raleigh Baskin. Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2016. 208 pages. $16.99/hardcover; $7.99/paperback (released May 16, 2017); $10.99/eBook. Recommended for ages 8–12. The introduction to this book gives a hint as to what comes next. My immediate thought was: I wonder how this story would land for me if I had not experienced that […]

Lucinda Hathaway is a member of Sarasota (Fla.) Meeting and author of Takashi’s Voyage: The Wreck of the Sindia and ’Round the World: Takashi Sails Home.


Posted in: Quaker Book Reviews, Quaker Summers, Young Friends Bookshelf
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